NO SCHOOL COUNSELOR LEFT BEHIND: COUNSELORS USE OF DATA AND THEIR PERCEIVED OBSTACLES AND FACILITATORS

Open Access
Author:
(Reish) Miller, Billie J
Graduate Program:
Counselor Education
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
June 13, 2016
Committee Members:
  • Richard Hazler, Dissertation Advisor
  • Richard Hazler, Committee Chair
  • Edgar Paul Yoder, Committee Member
  • Jolynn Carney, Committee Member
  • Jerry G Trusty, Outside Member
Keywords:
  • Facilitators; Obstacles; data usage; counselors use of data; Love's 4 Conditions of Data-based Decision Making; DBDM
Abstract:
Legislation such as No Child Left Behind (NCLB) of 2001 created a situation where schools use data to track and monitor student success. Counselors are now being held to those same expectations that teachers and administrators have been since the NCLB legislation. Through this descriptive study, the obstacles and facilitators were explored by asking school counselors their perceived impact on their use of data in their counseling program. 406 school counselors from the ASCA membership directory reported how much they use data in their programs, in what ways do they use those data, and what factors they believe impede and facilitate their use of data. Love’s 4 Conditions of Data-based Decision Making were also explored. The primary research question for this study was, how do school counselors involved in RAMP Data Teams, Non-RAMP Data Teams, and those not involved in data teams (No Data Teams) differ on factors surrounding their use of data? The highest impeding obstacles reported were time, availability to data teams, and data use culture. The highest facilitative ratings reported were data skills, importance of data and access to data. The hypothesized results were partially confirmed. These results demonstrated that both RAMP and Non-RAMP Data Team Counselors were significantly higher than No Data Team Counselors on Love’s 4 Conditions of Data-based Decision Making and the Facilitator-Obstacle Index. This suggests that being part of a data team might be as important or more important than RAMP itself on counselors’ data usage. Only Non-RAMP Data Team Counselors were significantly higher on their frequency of data usage. Non-RAMP Data Team Counselors reported using data on a weekly basis compared to RAMP Data Team Counselors and No Data Team Counselors using data on a monthly basis. Participation on a data team appears to have a positive influence on data usage. Implications for practice and recommendations for future research are presented.