TURKISH MOTHERS’ ATTITUDES TOWARD CHILDREARING PRACTICES

Open Access
Author:
Tekin, Gokce
Graduate Program:
Curriculum and Instruction
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
September 17, 2008
Committee Members:
  • Thomas Daniel Yawkey, Committee Chair
  • Daniel Dean Hade, Committee Member
  • Hoi Kin Suen, Committee Member
  • Edgar Paul Yoder, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • Istanbul
  • childrearing attitudes
  • Turkish mothers
  • parental attitudes
  • early childhood education
  • Turkey
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to learn about Turkish mothers’ parental attitudes toward childrearing practices. In particular, Turkish mothers’ (1) attitudes toward overparenting, (2) democratic parental attitudes, (3) attitudes toward hostility and rejection, (4) attitudes toward marital discord, and (5) authoritarian parental attitudes were investigated here. This study also explored the influence of demographic characteristics on these attitudes. The demographic characteristics examined included mothers’ age, marital and employment status, education and income levels, number of children, youngest child’s age, and children’s gender. Participants included 401 Turkish mothers with children aged 0–6 years old from five early childhood education centers in Istanbul. The mothers’ attitudes toward childrearing practices were measured using a Turkish version of the Parental Attitude Research Instrument (PARI). The validity and reliability of the PARI scale were also ascertained in this study. Additionally, a demographic survey was designed by the researcher to determine mothers’ age, marital and employment status, education and income levels, number of children, youngest child’s age, and children’s gender. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. The findings from the descriptive statistics provided information about Turkish mothers’ parental attitudes. Multiple linear regression analysis (MLRA) was also used to understand the influence of demographic characteristics on mothers’ attitudes toward childrearing practices. The findings revealed that mothers’ monthly family income was the strongest predictor of their attitudes toward childrearing practices. Increased level of monthly family income was associated with positive attitudes toward childrearing practices. Additionally, participants’ education level was found to influence their authoritarian parental attitudes and attitudes toward overparenting. Specifically, higher levels of education were associated with decreased attitudes toward overparenting and authoritarian attitudes, compared to mothers with lower education levels. Employment status of mothers was found to be related to mothers’ attitudes toward hostility and rejection in childrearing practices. Mothers who were employed possessed a lower level of hostility and experienced fewer feelings of rejection compared to mothers with other employment statuses. Other demographic characteristics, including mothers’ age, marital status, number of children, youngest child’s age, and children’s gender, were found not to influence Turkish mothers’ attitudes toward childrearing practices. This study contributes to the literature by updating research on Turkish mothers’ attitudes toward childrearing practices. Recommendations were also generated for further research. The implications of this study for young children, parents, practitioners, and policy makers in the field of early childhood education in Turkey were provided.