AN INFORMATION-TECHNOLOGY-PEOPLE INVESTIGATION OF INFORMATION PRIVACY- THE CASE OF CHILDREN’S ONLINE PRIVACY

Open Access
Author:
Irani, Nazneen Noshir
Graduate Program:
Computer Science and Engineering
Degree:
Master of Science
Document Type:
Master Thesis
Date of Defense:
June 10, 2008
Committee Members:
  • Sencun Xu, Thesis Advisor
  • Heng Xu, Thesis Advisor
Keywords:
  • Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA)
  • children online safety
  • value sensitive design
  • Online privacy
  • privacy tool
Abstract:
The current literature on privacy addresses the need for privacy, user's perceptions of privacy, privacy-enhancing solutions and other related aspects. What lacks is an attempt to present the essence of privacy in a coherent, definable manner within the context of all the related factors that affect it. Therefore, we first propose an Information-Technology-People (I-T-P) framework to integrate the existing literature on privacy and to provide a conceptual analysis of multi-disciplinary works on privacy from within the perspective of the I-T-P framework. We believe that the integrative framework through the I-T-P analysis not only provides a comprehensive list of factors to assess and understand information privacy in, but it also suggests design principles for development of effective privacy aware solutions. The second objective of this research is to address the acute privacy challenge of protecting children’s online safety by creating a tool to empower parental control over their child’s personal information disclosed online. This research employs the Value Sensitive Design method to create an innovative toolkit named COP – Children’s Online Privacy protection tool. The COP tool utilizes the value sensitive design approach that adopts a tripartite methodology by systematically integrating and iterating on conceptual, technical and empirical investigations of online privacy. This study reported here is novel to the extent that existing research has not systematically examined the privacy issues from the value sensitive design perspective. We believe that, using the groundwork laid down in this study, future research along these directions could contribute significantly to minimizing parental concerns for children’s online safety.