STRESSORS, SUPPORT FOR INNOVATION, OPENNESS TO EXPERIENCE AND CONSCIENTIOUSNESS AS PREDICTORS OF DEPERSONALIZATION AND PERSONAL ACCOMPLISHMENT AMONG CANADIAN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS

Open Access
Author:
Wyglinski, Laura A.
Graduate Program:
School Psychology
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
December 18, 2007
Committee Members:
  • Barbara Schaefer, Committee Chair
  • Robert Leslie Hale, Committee Member
  • Marley Watkins, Committee Member
  • Alicia Grandey, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • burnout
  • stress
  • school psychologists
  • factor analysis
  • personality
Abstract:
Professional stress and burnout can be substantial issues for school psychologists. Beehr’s (1994) model of stress was applied to a national sample of Canadian school psychologists in the investigation of stressors, levels of burnout, and the moderator variables of conscientiousness, openness of experience, and climate for innovation. The present study identified a four-factor solution of the School Psychology Stress Inventory (Wise, 1985) using principal axis factoring with varimax rotation, and themes emerging from the present four-factor solution are consistent with previous research. Although studies of stress have been conducted with samples of school psychologists, research has not examined the moderator of climate for innovation. Hierarchical regression determined the degree to which scores of the School Psychology Stress Inventory (Wise, 1985), NEO-Five Factor Inventory Form S (Costa & McCrae, 1992), and Climate for Innovation Measure (Scott & Bruce, 1994) added to the prediction of personal accomplishment or depersonalization as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Maslach & Jackson, 1986). The models predicting the criterion of depersonalization explained, at maximum, 22% of the variance and the models predicting personal accomplishment predicted, at maximum, 17% of the variance. When factor scores for stress were entered into the models, an increase in variance explained in the prediction of depersonalization and personal accomplishment was evident (28.9% and 25.4%, respectively). Implications of these Canadian findings are discussed in terms of the theoretical model, the constraints of school psychologists’ roles in various systems, and implications for practice.