THE EFFECTS OF MACHIAVELLIANISM, PERSPECTIVE TAKING, AND EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE COMPONENTS ON NEGOTIATION STRATEGIES AND OUTCOMES

Open Access
Author:
Baytalskaya, Nataliya
Graduate Program:
Psychology
Degree:
Master of Science
Document Type:
Master Thesis
Date of Defense:
December 17, 2007
Committee Members:
  • Susan Mohammed, Thesis Advisor
Keywords:
  • emotional intelligence
  • individual differences
  • negotiation
Abstract:
While some pop negotiation guides still claim that emotions have no business at the negotiation table, in the past decade, an increasing number of researchers have argued that emotions have a natural and functional role in negotiations and should therefore be given focus in the negotiation literature. This study examines four individual differences related to emotions (Machiavellianism, perspective taking, emotional understanding, and emotional management) and their effects on negotiation outcomes and strategy utilization at the individual and dyad level of analysis. It investigates which individual differences facilitate the use of emotional and cognitive negotiation tactics and which lead to higher levels of individual and joint gain, as well as viability and negotiation satisfaction. The study analyzes data collected from 88 undergraduate student dyads in a lab study that asked participants to negotiate with each other in the roles of job candidate or new manager. Results suggest that while Machiavellianism enabled the use of more distributive and emotional strategies, no other individual differences were related to negotiation outcomes or strategies. However, the use of integrative strategies led to higher levels of individual and joint gain, and males were found to perform better than females with regard to both negotiation outcomes and strategy utilization. Suggestions for future research on individual differences in negotiations are discussed as well as practical and theoretical implications of the research.