Profitability and Compatibility Factors Explaining Faculty's Post-adoption Behaviors of Teaching and Learning Innovations in Research One Universities

Open Access
Author:
Hsieh, Meng-Fen
Graduate Program:
Instructional Systems
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
November 13, 2006
Committee Members:
  • Barbara L Grabowski, Committee Chair
  • Alison Alene Carr Chellman, Committee Member
  • Jill L Lane, Committee Member
  • Pui Wa Lei, Committee Member
  • Edgar Paul Yoder, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • sustaining
  • course innovation
  • higher education
  • transferring
  • and diffusing
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to create predictive models to systematically explain the impact of 6 profitability factors—Organizational Support, Collegiality within Department, Collegiality above Department, P&T Focus on Teaching and Research, Influence of Course Changes on P&T, and P&T Feedback Received about Course Changes and 4 compatibility factors—Positive Department Culture, Student-centered Teaching Philosophy, Innovation Philosophy, and Teaching Motivation on the sustaining, transferring, and diffusing of a teaching and learning innovation. From December 2005 to January 2006, a total of 163 faculty participants from a Research I university completed an online survey whose responses were used for data analysis. The results of factor and reliability analysis confirmed that the researcher-designed measurement instrument, Survey of Post–adoption of Teaching and Learning Course Changes, was valid for this purpose and responses were reliable. Six logistic regression models were created based on the three dependent variables to examine whether or not faculty sustained, transferred, and diffused their innovation––as explained by the 10 predictors. The six models were all significant. Six multiple regression models were then run to further examine the extent to which the changes were sustained, transferred, and diffused as predicted by the 10 predictors. The original diffusing model and the final sustaining, transferring, and diffusing models were all significant. Predictions to sustain a teaching and learning innovation would be made based on P&T Feedback Received about Course Changes and Influence of Course Changes on P&T. Predictions to transfer a teaching and learning innovation would be made based on P&T Feedback Received about Course Changes, Innovation Philosophy, and Student-Centered Teaching Philosophy. Predictions to diffuse a teaching and learning innovation would be made based on P&T Feedback Received about Course Changes, Teaching Motivation, P&T Focus on Teaching and Research, and Organizational Support. This study provides a research framework to better explain the sustaining, transferring, and diffusing of an instructional innovation. Moreover, this study bridges the gap between the literature on organizational innovation and instructional innovation as well as prior-, during-, and post-adoption behaviors. This study verifies some of the findings from sustainability research and added to the understanding of factors explain transfer and diffusion.