THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES AND ATTITUDE TOWARD INDEPENDENT LEARNING IN A HIGH TRANSACTIONAL DISTANCE ENVIRONMENT

Open Access
Author:
Mulhollen, Christine Marie
Graduate Program:
Adult Education
Degree:
Doctor of Education
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
April 27, 2006
Committee Members:
  • Michael Grahame Moore, Committee Chair
  • Gary Kuhne, Committee Member
  • Melody M Thompson, Committee Member
  • Mindy L Kornhaber, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • independent learning
  • adult education
  • distance education
  • transactional distance
  • multiple intelligences
  • attitude
Abstract:
ABSTRACT It has previously been theorized, but not verified, that higher degrees of transactional distance, and the engagement of a variety of the multiple intelligences, are each associated with higher levels of learner autonomy and independence. It therefore seemed likely that learners who have successfully progressed in a learning environment that had both a higher degree of transactional distance and which engaged a variety of the intelligences (as opposed to just one or two of the intelligences) would actually have higher levels of learner autonomy, and subsequently demonstrate this through positive attitudes toward independent learning. For these learners, it was believed that there may be a positive relationship between their strengths in one or more of the intelligences, and their attitude toward independent learning. The Multiple Intelligences Developmental Assessment Scales (MIDAS) and Adult Attitudes Toward Independent Learning (AATILS) surveys were provided to a sample of adults who all had experienced similar high transactional distance learning environments which engaged a variety of the intelligences. Results demonstrated that these learners did demonstrate positive attitudes toward independent learning, and that interpersonal intelligence was predictive of attitude toward independent learning (p<0.001). These results were significant in that they supported previous theories regarding the relationship of autonomy and transactional distance (Moore, 1980, 1983, 1993, and Moore & Kearsley, 2005), as well as suggestions of a relationship between the engagement of a variety of the intelligences with autonomy (Chan, 2000; Diaz-Lefebvre, 1999; Walters, 1992; and Williams, 1995) and independence (Cornwell, 2001; and Mantzaris, 2001). The ability of interpersonal intelligence to predict attitudes toward independent learning suggested a dynamic relationship may exist between interpersonal intelligence, dialogue, transactional distance, autonomy, independence, and interdependence.