STRANGE BEDFELLOWS: ORGANIZATIONAL OBSTACLES TO PRISON--NON-PROFIT PARTNERSHIPS IN THE PROVISION OF INMATE TREATMENT PROGRAMS

Open Access
Author:
Craig, Susan Clark
Graduate Program:
Crime, Law and Justice
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
April 10, 2002
Committee Members:
  • Thomas J. Bernard, Committee Member
  • John Henry Kramer, Committee Chair
  • Alan A Block, Committee Chair
  • Jeffery Todd Ulmer, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • Prison Organization
  • Inmate Treatment Programs
Abstract:
This dissertation presents a case study of a partnership between a women's prison and a not-for-profit social services agency in the establishment of a therapeutic community inside a prison for women inmates reporting a history of domestic violence and sexual abuse. The dissertation develops a typology of organizational structures and behaviors based on the work of DiIulio and McGregor that predicts that prisons characterized by an orientation toward hierarchy, formality and security will be less well equipped to interact with and manage the work of external agencies characterized by flat structure, informality and openness. This typology is used to analyze the prison and agency as organizations and to analyze their interactions in the course of setting up the program. The study shows how program implementation was affected by the respective organizations' failure to recognize and harmonize their differences in structure, mission, and approach to dealing with inmates, and discusses the organizational lessons learned. The study makes recommendations regarding organizational issues that should be addressed when prisons outsource internal functions to outside organizations.