THE EFFECT OF PERSONAL VALUES, ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE, AND PERSON-ORGANIZATION FIT ON INDIVIDUAL OUTCOMES IN THE RESTAURANT INDUSTRY

Open Access
Author:
Tepeci, Mustafa
Graduate Program:
Man Environment Relations
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
April 04, 2001
Committee Members:
  • Albert Laurence Bartlett Iii, Committee Chair
  • Linda K Trevino, Committee Member
  • Arun Upneja, Committee Member
  • Garry Chick, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • values
  • hospitality
  • culture
  • restaurant industry
  • employee attitudes
  • person-organization fit
Abstract:
Person-Organization fit seeks to identify how congruence of organizational culture and individual values predicts individual attitudes and behaviors. This study developed the Hospitality Industry Culture Profile (HICP), an instrument to assess perceived organizational culture, preferred organizational culture (interpreted as individual values), and person-organization (P-O) fit in hospitality organizations. The instrument was administered to a sample of 326 employees representing 34 restaurants. A seven-factor structure of organizational culture was identified. A .67 correlation among culture profiles of 26 restaurants suggests an industry-wide restaurant culture exists. Then, perceived organizational culture, preferred organizational culture, and the fit between the two (P-O fit) were assessed as predictors of job satisfaction, intent to remain, and willingness to recommend the organization. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted at the individual-level and cross-level. Among perceived culture factors, only the Honesty/People Orientation factor predicted the outcomes. Among preferred culture factors, the Honesty/People Orientation and Fair Compensation/Employee Development factors predicted the outcomes. Perceived and calculated P-O fit were assessed. Mixed and limited results in correlating the measures indicate continuing questions about measurement of P-O fit. Perceived fit was found to explain variance in the outcomes beyond that explained by organizational culture and individual values, but calculated fit did not. Perceived and calculated P-O fit explained significant variance in the outcomes when perceived and preferred culture were not in the model. For hospitality research, the HICP provides a tool to further assess culture, individual values, fit, and their effects. For hospitality practice, the findings support hiring and socializing employees to enhance fit, and managing employees to demonstrate people orientation, honesty, and overall concern for employees' well-being.