A Case Study to Examine Institutional Factors Facilitating and Inhibiting Faculty Preparation for Teaching in an Online MBA Program

Open Access
Author:
Kashyap, Shubha
Graduate Program:
Workforce Education and Development
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
February 07, 2014
Committee Members:
  • William J Rothwell, Dissertation Advisor
  • Judith Ann Kolb, Committee Member
  • Susan E Cromwell, Committee Member
  • Edgar Paul Yoder, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • Faculty Preparation
  • Online Education
  • Online MBA program
  • Institutional Factors
  • Facilitating Change
  • Higher Education
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine institutional facilitating and inhibiting factors that enabled and constrained faculty preparation for teaching in an online MBA program. Using the framework of Transformation Learning Theory to guide the research, this study enhances the field of online learning and higher education because it brings understanding to the topics of online education, faculty preparation, and online MBA programs. This study funneled existing literature and research related to the following five areas that laid the foundation for the purpose of this study: Force Field analysis as a framework for organizational analysis and change; online education principles for faculty; developing faculty competencies for online teaching; institutional resources for online teaching preparation; and faculty preparation for teaching in online MBA programs. The single-site case study method was used to examine faculty preparation to teach in an online MBA program at a US university. The research questions were: 1. What were the facilitating factors at the institution that enabled faculty preparation for teaching in an online MBA program? 2. What were the inhibiting factors at the institution that constrained faculty preparation for teaching in an online MBA program? An original interview instrument was developed using the assistance of five individuals serving as key informants. Data collection consisted of interviews with nine faculty members, interviews with three individuals that served in instructional design and management roles, and other primary and secondary sources of data. Collected data were coded using open and axial coding techniques. Analysis of data resulted in development of five themes of institutional facilitating and inhibiting factors that enabled and constrained faculty preparation: Energy and Effort, Pedagogical Shifts, Technology Interface, Institutional Support, and Instructional Design and Program Support. Findings from this study could help orient institutions and faculty preparing to deliver and teach online MBA degree programs. The information gathered could be used by faculty, universities administrators, business schools administrators, program chairs and directors of online programs, and faculty development professionals to understand the institutional facilitating and inhibiting factors for faculty members preparing to teach online. By taking active steps to prepare and develop faculty to teach online, university institutions may support faculty with opportunities to develop not only discipline-specific business competencies, but also delivery-specific online teaching competencies.