SEED AID, SMALLHOLDERS, AND THE DEVELOPMENTAL STATE: A MIXED METHODS ANALYSIS OF EMERGENCY RELIEF PROGRAMS IN ETHIOPIA

Open Access
Author:
Man, Christian Richard
Graduate Program:
Rural Sociology
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
September 05, 2018
Committee Members:
  • Leland Glenna, Dissertation Advisor/Co-Advisor
  • Leland Glenna, Committee Chair/Co-Chair
  • Brian Thiede, Committee Member
  • Carolyn Sachs, Committee Member
  • Karl Zimmerer, Outside Member
Keywords:
  • Ethiopia
  • seed security
  • foreign aid
  • political economy
  • international development
  • seed aid
Abstract:
In 2015, El Niño induced the worst drought Ethiopia had seen in fifty years. The resulting crop failures left as many as eighteen million people in need of aid, with one-third of the country’s woredas classified as facing dire food insecurity. Tens of millions of dollars in foreign aid poured into the country in response. A portion of this aid was given as seed to smallholders. Drawing on quantitative and qualitative data collected with farmers in four regions of Ethiopia in 2016 following the aid distributions, this dissertation analyzes how the Ethiopian state and Ethiopian smallholders respectively utilize seed aid. I suggest these utilization strategies coincide, that they serve different ends, and that, together, they illustrate the complex effects of emergency response.