TEACHING EDUCATORS TO USE THE SYSTEM OF LEAST PROMPTS TO SUPPORT COMMUNICATION OF INDIVIDUALS WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER (ASD) WHO USE AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION (AAC)

Open Access
Author:
Mccoy, Ashley Rae
Graduate Program:
Special Education
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
June 04, 2018
Committee Members:
  • David Brent Mcnaughton, Dissertation Advisor/Co-Advisor
  • David Brent Mcnaughton, Committee Chair/Co-Chair
  • David Lee, Committee Member
  • Tracy Jane Raulston, Committee Member
  • Janice Catherine Light, Outside Member
  • Pamela S Wolfe, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • system of least prompts
  • teacher training
  • autism spectrum disorder
  • augmentative and alternative communication
Abstract:
The present study evaluated the effects of online training on educators’ knowledge and use of the system of least prompts (SLP) to support the communication of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). A quasi-experimental pre/post test group design with switching replications was used to measure the knowledge, planning, and implementation of SLP. The three dependent variables, were: (a) percent correct on knowledge of system of least prompts, measured by a 30-item multiple choice quiz, (b) percent correct on performance of planning for system of least prompts, measured by a task analysis checklist, and (c) percent correct on performance of SLP implementation during teleconference role-plays, measured by a task analysis checklist. Results indicate that the training was effective in increasing educators’ knowledge of SLP as well as the ability to plan for SLP. Implementation of SLP also increased over time, however, data analysis did not support the conclusion that this result was directly related to the online training alone. Additional results suggest that the participants viewed online instruction, with teleconference role-plays and case studies, as a socially valid activity. Participants reported learning a valuable skill and as a result of the training were more confident working with individuals who use AAC. Implications, limitations, and directions for future research are also discussed.