THE EFFECTS OF CELL MORPHOLOGY ON NANOPARTICLE UPTAKE AND UPTAKE AT THE LEADING EDGE IN MC3T3 CELLS

Open Access
Author:
Li, Harvey S
Graduate Program:
Bioengineering
Degree:
Master of Science
Document Type:
Master Thesis
Date of Defense:
April 10, 2018
Committee Members:
  • Justin Lee Brown, Thesis Advisor
  • William O Hancock, Committee Member
  • Xiaojun Lian, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • cell
  • cell morphology
  • nanoparticles
  • endocytosis
  • immunostaining
  • live-cell imaging
  • MC3T3 cells
  • microcontact printing
  • y-27632
Abstract:
When using the correct material coupled with drugs and specific surface ligands, nanoparticles can have enhanced targeted drug delivery properties. Currently, scientists can alter the size, shape, material, and surface properties among other factors in order to change the characteristics of the nanoparticles and how the body reacts to them1. While much research has been done looking at how varying the properties of nanoparticles affect nanoparticle uptake, little research has been done to see how varying cell properties affect nanoparticle uptake. Additionally, it is known that the extracellular matrix of tumor tissue is different than that of healthy tissue. The differences in ECM organization causes the tumor cells to take on certain patterns, which may affect nanoparticle and drug uptake. The aims of this project are twofold: first, I will compare the rate of nanoparticle uptake at the leading edge to that at the trailing edge, then, I would like to see how cell morphology affects nanoparticle uptake. The results from these experiments indicate that there is a difference in nanoparticle uptake in elongated and non-elongated cells. The leading edge of a cell also appears to contain more nanoparticles than the trailing edge of a cell; however, this is not dependent on cellular elongation.