COLLEGE STUDENT DRINKING: AN UNDERSTANDING OF LEVEL OF DEPENDENCE, MENTAL HEALTH, FAMILIAL HISTORY, & PERSONALITY DIMENSIONS

Open Access
Author:
Atkinson, Heather Anne
Graduate Program:
Counselor Education
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
July 10, 2017
Committee Members:
  • Jolynn Carney, Dissertation Advisor
  • Jolynn Carney, Committee Chair
  • Diandra Janelle Prescod, Committee Member
  • Margaret Ann Lorah, Committee Member
  • Edgar Paul Yoder, Outside Member
Keywords:
  • College Students
  • Alcohol Intervention
  • Mental Health
  • Personality
  • Family History
Abstract:
The Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS: Dimeff et al., 1999) is a program used in higher education institutions to reduce drinking outcomes. Level of dependence on alcohol is a global and multidisciplinary concern. The connections between mental health (anxiety and depression) have been well established in the literature. Other connections such as family history and personality dimensions are being further explored. This study reviewed the prevalence and consequences of alcohol use as well as the connections to the specific population of college students. Theoretical frameworks from Chickering and Baxter Magolda are discussed. Quantitative analysis including regression was used to examine the connections between level of dependence on alcohol with the mental health, familial history, and personality dimensions of college students. Results indicated that participants were predominately, male, white, 18-19 years-old, freshman or sophomore, domestic students, and resided in campus residence halls. Research question one results showed that gender is a moderator and that participants’ anxiety, other drug use, and number of consequences significantly predicted their level of dependence. In research question two, gender was again a moderator and self-efficacy was statistically significant and negative. Research question three showed that gender is a moderator and that anxiety, impulsivity, hopelessness, and self-efficacy were statistically significant. For this third model self-efficacy and hopelessness had negative beta scores.