THE CURRICULUM OF THE CARLISLE INDAIN INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL: AN AMERICAN EDUCATION

Open Access
Author:
Meness, Joy Noelle
Graduate Program:
Curriculum and Instruction
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
March 30, 2017
Committee Members:
  • Dr. Daniel Hade, Dissertation Advisor
  • Dr. Daniel Hade, Committee Chair
  • Dr. Jacqueline Reid-Walsh, Committee Member
  • Dr. Jamie M. Myers, Committee Member
  • Dr. Christine Marme Thompson, Outside Member
Keywords:
  • Carlisle Indian Industrial School
  • curriculum
  • Haudenosaunee
  • Richard Pratt
  • United States Army
  • books
  • texts
  • colonization
  • children
  • military
  • students
  • residential boarding school
  • Indian
  • Pennsylvania
  • Penn State University
  • Cumberland County Historical Society
  • NARA
  • reader
  • pedagogy
  • archive
  • precedent
  • historical
  • library
  • American education
Abstract:
During the latter half of the 18th century, as aggressive and violent militarization continued, the United States legislated against Indian interests while promoting social advancement through industrial education. While boarding schools had been presented to European society as elite institutions for centuries, their transition to19th century North America signified a radical shift in form and function. Under orders carried out by the U.S. military, Native children were forcibly removed from their families to be educated at residential schools, undergoing training similar to that of military and prison inductees. Therefore the pedagogical roots of American Indian education during the 19th century were steeped in practices meant to assimilate Indigenous children into American society psychologically, spiritually, and physically. Founded in 1879, the Carlisle Indian Industrial School was established by United States Army General Richard H. Pratt, and the school ushered in a new era, one that promoted a militarized model for North American Indian education through English only instruction. Through historical analysis and contemporary Indigenous writings, this thesis examines the cultural context of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School curriculum using a framework that supports a collective body of boarding school research embedded within the overall context of American education.