THE EFFECT OF JOB TITLE AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES ON APPLICANT REACTIONS

Open Access
Author:
Lee, Young Eun
Graduate Program:
Human Resources and Employment Relations
Degree:
Master of Science
Document Type:
Master Thesis
Date of Defense:
March 30, 2017
Committee Members:
  • Stan Gully, Thesis Advisor
  • Jean Phillips, Committee Member
  • Sarah Damaske, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • Job title
  • PJ fit
  • CSE
  • Status Aspiration
  • Job Attraction
  • Job Prestige
Abstract:
A job advertisement is one of the earliest sources of information for job applicants. There are many ways to tap into talent pools, but using a job advertisement is one of the most frequently used methods to gain the attention of potential applicants. With the increasing popularity of job search websites, where job applicants can easily compare and contrast different job advertisements from different companies, job advertisements should be given more attention to see if they can better attract potential applicants to the job. This study examined the effect of job titles in job advertisements on applicants’ attraction to a job in a fictional company. The proposed theoretical model suggests individual differences in core self-evaluations and status aspiration influence whether an applicant is attracted to a particular type of job advertisement. The model was tested through a series of moderated regression analyses with data gathered from 197 working professionals who completed surveys through Amazon’s Mechanical Turk Program. The results are somewhat contradictory to what was predicted, but perceived person-job fit and perceived job prestige were found to be positively related to job attraction. The implications for future theory on applicant attraction as well as recruitment practices are considered in the discussion of key findings.