AN AUTOETHNOGRAPHIC CASE STUDY OF A COLLABORATION WITHIN A SECONDARY CO-TEACHING INCLUSIVE SETTING

Open Access
Author:
Savini, Denise Danielle
Graduate Program:
Curriculum and Instruction
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
July 29, 2011
Committee Members:
  • Jamie Myers, Dissertation Advisor
  • Jamie Myers, Committee Chair
  • Jacqueline Edmondson, Committee Member
  • James F Nolan Jr., Committee Member
  • Susan C Faircloth, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • secondary
  • collaboration
  • inclusion
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to explore the collaboration of co-teachers in a secondary inclusive setting through an autoethnographic approach. “In terms of labels, autoethnography is derived from ethnography, a research method primarily concerned with studying the other” (Starr, 2010, p. 3). Additionally, this research approach embraces personal experiences as data and uses narrative as a vehicle for sharing such data with the reader. The traditional format of a dissertation creates the framework for this dissertation. However, some literary terms accompany sections to guide the reader. The data collected from artifacts, journals, emails, presentations, memos, and personal experience reflect the complexity of collaboration in a co-teaching setting between a biology teacher and myself, a reading specialist. Despite knowing the models of collaboration and embracing many of the characteristics of collaboration, significant struggle occurred. This study captures the process of collaboration, including the struggle; reveals strategies that supported us through struggle; and discusses implications collaboration has for moving toward a secondary inclusive model.