WEB-BASED TRAINING FOR INNOVATION: AN EXAMINATION OF TRAINING REGIMENS, TRAINING ENVIRONMENT AND THE MODERATING INFLUENCE OF CREATIVE PERSONAL IDENTITY AND INTRINSIC MOTIVATION

Open Access
Author:
Cassidy, Scott Edward
Graduate Program:
Psychology
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
June 01, 2011
Committee Members:
  • Samuel Todd Hunter, Dissertation Advisor
  • Samuel Todd Hunter, Committee Chair
  • Rick R Jacobs, Committee Member
  • James Lewis Farr, Committee Member
  • John Messner, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • creativity
  • innovation
  • training
Abstract:
The ability to enhance innovation is crucial for organizational success in today’s rapidly changing and technologically-driven workplace and, in order for employees to contribute to organizational innovation in the modern workplace, online training has emerged as a significant trend for organizational training and development. Little research, however, has been conducted on how to best design and implement such training to enhance innovation among employees. With the Osborn-Parnes Creative Problem Solving (CPS) program as the conceptual framework, three online training programs were developed, implemented, and evaluated for their relative effectiveness for enhancing innovative performance. Innovative performance was conceptualized as having two dimensions, creativity and implementation planning, each consisting of two facets (quality and originality and penetration and forecasting, respectively). It was hypothesized that a full CPS training program would have the greatest impact on innovative performance, both at the dimension and facet levels, and that creative personal identity and intrinsic motivation would exhibit moderating, interactive influences. Three hundred and eighty-six participants completed one of three different training regimens (full CPS, ideational skills training only, or control training). An additional experimental condition involving training environment was also tested, creating a repeated measures, 3 X 2 factorial study design whereby training type and training environment functioned as between-subjects factors and pre and post-training innovative performance functioned as the within-subjects dependent variable. Hypotheses were partially supported and two consistent findings emerged: 1) a distinct positive trend for the IDS only condition indicating that online IDS only training may be more effective for enhancing innovative performance, as compared to full CPS or control training, and 2) a strong environment effect indicating that the provision of online creative problem solving training in a more formal, controlled setting results in higher overall innovative performance than does the identical training in a non-lab setting. Theoretical and practical contributions, study limitations, and future research areas are also discussed.