THE INFLUENCE OF INDIVIDUAL TRAITS ON ABSTINENCE SELF-EFFICACY IN DEPENDENT SMOKERS

Open Access
Author:
MacLean, Robert Ross
Graduate Program:
Psychology
Degree:
Master of Science
Document Type:
Master Thesis
Date of Defense:
None
Committee Members:
  • Stephen Wilson, Ph D, Thesis Advisor
  • Stephen Jeffrey Wilson, Thesis Advisor
  • Amy Dyanna Marshall, Thesis Advisor
  • Alysia Yvonne Blandon, Thesis Advisor
Keywords:
  • Self-efficacy
  • Self-control
  • Impulsivity
  • Smoking
Abstract:
The majority of cigarette smokers express a desire to quit; however, many smokers struggle to achieve and maintain abstinence. Relapse frequently occurs soon after smoking cessation, and most smokers have multiple unsuccessful quit attempts. Abstinence self-efficacy (ASE) has been shown to be a critical component in successful smoking cessation outcomes. Developed from Social Cognitive Theory, self-efficacy is an individual’s judgment of his or her own ability to execute a behavior in a prospective situation. Higher ASE is linked with decreased negative withdrawal symptoms and increased likelihood of abstinence. Although nicotine dependence and craving have been shown to be associated with ASE, few studies have investigated theoretical determinants of ASE and the contribution of personality traits. Impulsivity and self-control are two such personality characteristics that can influence how a smoker may respond in highly tempting situations. The inclusion of personality traits in the development of ASE has the potential to inform specific interventions in smoking cessation.