THE EFFECTS OF MULTIPLE ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATES ON ORGANIZATIONAL, CUSTOMER-RATED, AND INDIVIDUAL OUTCOMES: A MULTI-CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Open Access
Author:
Baytalskaya, Nataliya
Graduate Program:
Psychology
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
January 12, 2100
Committee Members:
  • Susan Mohammed, Committee Chair
  • James Farr, Committee Member
  • Rick Jacobs, Committee Member
  • Dave Almeida, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • organizational climate
  • national culture
  • multinational organizations
Abstract:
Due to recent rekindled interest in the influences of organizational context , researchers and organizations have begun to realize the importance and predictive power of organizational climate in all aspects of organizational life. However, though multiple climates exist simultaneously in organizations, most climate research has focused only on one type of climate in a given study. This study examines how six different organizational climates (support, growth, justice, senior leadership, immediate supervisor, and innovative service) affect organizational and individual outcome variables (organizational financial performance, organizational productivity, guest satisfaction, turnover and OCBs), how these climate dimensions interact, and how national culture influences climate-outcome relationships. The study analyzes data collected from a multi-national organization in the hospitality industry comprising 151,656 individuals in 43 countries. Self-reported organizational climate data were examined in relation to hotel level indices of financial performance, productivity, turnover and guest satisfaction scores, as well as self-reported OCBs. Results suggest that innovative service climate was positively related to guest satisfaction but not to financial performance. However, ancillary results suggest that the interaction between innovative service and leadership climate is associated with higher financial performance and guest satisfaction outcomes. Furthermore, results show that the presence of justice and growth climates were associated with lower hourly employee turnover while justice and support climates were found to be positively associated with OCBs. The findings, however, failed to show any significant moderating influences of national culture dimensions on the organizational climate-outcome relationships. Suggestions for future research on how climate types function in organizations are discussed as well as practical implications of the research.