EXPLORING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPES AND COGNITIVE STYLES AND THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS TO PROPOSED SOCIAL LEARNERS’ LEARNING STYLES THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF SOCIAL LEARNERS LEARNING STYLES SURVEY

Open Access
Author:
Wu, Shao-Wei
Graduate Program:
Instructional Systems
Degree:
Doctor of Philosophy
Document Type:
Dissertation
Date of Defense:
May 25, 2010
Committee Members:
  • John David Popp, Dissertation Advisor
  • John David Popp, Committee Chair
  • Kyle Leonard Peck, Committee Chair
  • Francis M Dwyer Jr., Committee Member
  • Edgar Paul Yoder, Committee Member
Keywords:
  • Jung psychological types
  • cognitive styles analysis
  • learning styles
  • MBTI
  • social learner
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine if psychological types as described by Jung, Myers and Briggs, and cognitive styles, defined by Riding and Cheema, can be used to support the existence and definition of the learning styles of a group described by the researcher as social learners. From the psychological type and cognitive style theories, the researcher made assumptions about how they can be used to predict the learning styles of the social learners. A researcher developed survey was used to test the underlying assumptions and validate the prediction of the social learner learning styles. The results are intended to help instructors design and prepare courses to support and challenge learners of this type by recognizing individual differences of social learners. Two sets of secondary data were used in this study: 1) 141 undergraduate students who enrolled in an online course, 2) 22 graduate students who enrolled in an online course offered in two different semesters but taught by the same instructor. Data from all 163 students were included in a factor analysis designed to identify social learner characteristics and to test the reliability of the learning style survey. However, data from only the 132 participants from data pool I who completed the online learning styles survey, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and Cognitive Styles Analysis (CSA) (all three) were included to examine the relationships among psychological types, cognitive styles and learning styles. Exploratory factor analysis and expert reviews were used to see how the groupings of items on the researcher developed learning styles survey match the prediction of the theoretical model based on Type theory and Cognitive Styles. Four factors, including group work, structure, concrete and conceptual were extracted from the factor analysis and experts review. Group work and structure factors were combined as the main model. Although one of the proposed learning styles (harmonious factor) was dropped from the main model, statistical result showed that the remaining main model supported the existence of the social learner group. No significant difference was found between Analytic Non-FJ, Wholist Non-FJ, Analytic FJ and Wholist FJ on the main model. There was also no significant difference found for the two sub-groups, SFJ/NFJ and EFJ/IFJ on the concrete/conceptual factors and the main model respectively. Chi-Square was used to test the independence of Type Theory and Cognitive Style by testing whether any of the MBTI dichotomies was related to the Wholist-Analytic dimension of the cognitive style. An independent t-test was used to find out if the FJ and non-FJ types respond differently on the predicted social learner learning styles (factors from the learning style survey). Kruskal-Wallis (K-W) test was used to examine whether the Wholist-Analytic dimension of cognitive styles affects one’s social learner learning. Mann-Whitney test was utilized to test the difference between SFJ-NFJ and EFJ-IFJ types to determine if there are two sub-groups of social learner.